ICD-10 Code
International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision
Feb 25, 2017

ICD 10 External Causes of Injuries - “I”

Browse the alphabetic listing of the ICD 10 external causes of injuries. Use the Search term option to locate the injury term and its corresponding ICD 10 diagnosis code.

“I”Ictus to Intoxication

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  • Ictus

    • caloris — See also Heat
    • solaris - X30
  • Ignition (accidental)

    - X08.8See also Exposure, fire
    • anesthetic gas in operating room - W40.1
    • apparel - X06.2
      • from highly flammable material - X04
      • nightwear - X05
    • bed linen (sheets) (spreads) (pillows) (mattress) — see Exposure, fire, uncontrolled, building, bed
    • benzine - X04
    • clothes, clothing NEC (from controlled fire) - X06.2
      • from
        • highly flammable material - X04
    • ether - X04
      • in operating room - W40.1
    • explosive material — see Explosion
    • gasoline - X04
    • jewelry (plastic) (any) - X06.0
    • kerosene - X04
    • material
      • explosive — see Explosion
      • highly flammable with secondary explosion - X04
    • nightwear - X05
    • paraffin - X04
    • petrol - X04
  • Immersion (accidental)

    See also Drowning
    • hand or foot due to cold (excessive) - X31
  • Implantation of quills of porcupine

    - W55.89
  • Inanition (from) (hunger)

    - X58
  • Inappropriate operation performed

    • correct operation on wrong side or body part (wrong side) (wrong site) - Y65.53
    • operation intended for another patient done on wrong patient - Y65.52
    • wrong operation performed on correct patient - Y65.51
  • Inattention after, at birth (homicidal intent) (infanticidal intent)

    - X58
  • Incident, adverse

  • Incineration (accidental)

    see Exposure, fire
  • Infanticide

    see Assault
  • Infrasound waves (causing injury)

    - W49.9
  • Ingestion

    • foreign body (causing injury) (with obstruction) — see Foreign body, alimentary canal
    • poisonous
  • Inhalation

    • excessively cold substance, man-made — see Exposure, cold, man-made
    • food (any type) (into respiratory tract) (with asphyxia, obstruction respiratory tract, suffocation) - T18see categories T17 and
    • foreign body — see Foreign body, aspiration
    • gastric contents (with asphyxia, obstruction respiratory passage, suffocation) - T17.81
    • hot air or gases - X14.0
    • liquid air, hydrogen, nitrogen - W93.12
      • suicide (attempt) - X83.2
    • steam - X13.0
      • assault - X98.0
      • stated as undetermined whether accidental or intentional - Y27.0
      • suicide (attempt) - X77.0
    • toxic gas — see Table of Drugs and Chemicals
    • vomitus (with asphyxia, obstruction respiratory passage, suffocation) - T17.81
  • Injury, injured NOS (accidental(ly))

    - X58
    • by, caused by, from
      • assault — see Assault
      • law-enforcing agent, police, in course of legal intervention — see Legal intervention
      • suicide (attempt) - X83.8
    • due to, in
      • civil insurrection — see War operations
      • fight - Y04.0See also Assault, fight
      • war operations — see War operations
    • homicide - Y09See also Assault
    • inflicted (by)
      • in course of arrest, suppression of disturbance, maintenance of order, by law-enforcing agents (attempted) — see Legal intervention
      • other person
        • stated as
          • accidental - X58
          • intentional, homicide (attempt) — see Assault
          • undetermined whether accidental or intentional - Y33
    • purposely (inflicted) by other person(s) — see Assault
    • self-inflicted - X83.8
      • stated as accidental - X58
    • specified cause NEC - X58
    • undetermined whether accidental or intentional - Y33
  • Insolation, effects

    - X30
  • Insufficient nourishment

    - X58
  • Interruption of respiration (by)

    • food (lodged in esophagus) - T18see categories T17 and
    • vomitus (lodged in esophagus) - T17.81
  • Intervention, legal

    see Legal intervention
  • Intoxication

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When ICD 10 was implemented on October 1, 2015, it did not affect physicians', outpatient facilities', and hospital outpatient departments' use of CPT codes on Medicare Fee-For-Service claims. Providers should continue to use CPT codes to report these services.